Careers guidance brings better grades

Published

Young people do better at school when they are given good career advice, research from the University of Derby has found.

The report, Advancing Ambitions, revealed that schools which have a quality-marked careers programme see a two percentage point increase in the proportion of pupils achieving five A*-C GCSE grades, including English and Maths. There were also improvements in attendance, in A level results and in the number of students going on to university.

ASDAN's Careers and Experiencing Work Short Course provides a curriculum and structure for accrediting careers education and work experience, while career exploration forms a key part of many of ASDAN's qualifications. This report provides further evidence, alongside the re-appraisal of the CoPE effect, that engaged and motivated learners achieve more of their potential. 

Professor Tristram Hooley, who led the research, said: "It is in everyone’s interests that young people make decisions to go into courses and jobs that make good use of their talents, in which they will be able to succeed and which relate in some way to what the economy needs.

"But career support is particularly important for those young people who come from families where adults are in low-skill, low-pay employment and whose families don’t have a tradition of going to university. Career guidance contributes to social mobility by providing access to information, experiences and networks that can support young people to consider taking paths that no one from their family has ever trodden."