Report raises concerns about wellbeing of children in England

Published

An international comparison of the subjective wellbeing of children in 15 countries has concluded that children in England are less happy with their school experience than their peers in 11 other countries. The Good Childhood Report 2015 reveals children in England ranked low in relation to bullying and self-image, and were ranked 14th out of 15 countries for satisfaction with life as a whole.

Commenting on the Children's Society study, ASDAN's Chief Executive Maggie Walker said:

"We are not surprised by many of these findings. The narrow curriculum that most schools now feel obliged to follow will not suit many children whose interests and aptitudes may lie in different areas of study. We are extremely concerned that, from a relatively early age, many children and young people are branded as failures because their skills and qualities don't conform to the traditional view of the definition of being successful. Furthermore, the accountability agenda and the pressures on teachers are not necessarily conducive to good relationships in schools, when teacher effectiveness is often judged on examination results.

"ASDAN supports statutory provision of PSHE education, which promotes discussion and debate and would provide a vehicle for discussion in schools about personal development, the societal pressures that young people face and help schools to address issues such as bullying.

"We also wholeheartedly support the Children's Society's call for the Government to make it a legal requirement for schools in England to provide counselling and to allocate children's mental health funding to promoting children's well-being, rather than just dealing with problems after they occur."

The Good Childhood Report 2015 is the fourth in a series of annual reports published by The Children’s Society about how children in the UK feel about their lives http://www.childrenssociety.org.uk/what-we-do/resources-and-publications/the-good-childhood-report-2015