ASDAN congratulates top performing schools for GCSE results

Published

Three ASDAN registered centres are among the top performing schools in England for the achievement of the five A* to C performance measure by their low ability pupils.  

In a table produced by Schools Week on last year’s results, Wigston College in Leicestershire, Aylward Academy in London and Christ the King Catholic High School in Lancashire featured in the top ten schools for high outcomes for low ability pupils.

At Wigston College, 10% of low ability pupils achieved the benchmark of five A* to C grades including English and maths. The figure was 19% for both Aylward Academy and Christ the King Catholic High School. All three schools had above national average proportions of low ability pupils getting five A* to Cs including English and Maths.

Wigston College, Aylward Academy and Christ the King Catholic High School have more than 35% of learners in the low ability category. The schools are located in disadvantaged areas ­– more than 20% of learners at Wigston College receive free school meals; while the number is 62% for Aylward Academy and 47% for Christ the King Catholic High School.

Kath Grant, ASDAN Director of Education, said: “I would like to congratulate these ASDAN registered schools for demonstrating significant progress for all their learners despite the challenges they’ve faced.

“ASDAN provides a range of successful courses and qualifications that help pupils succeed at GCSE and develop key skills for learning, skills for employment and skills for life. A study from the University of the West of England of more than half a million pupils found that young people who passed ASDAN’s Certificate of Personal Effectiveness raised their chances of achieving A* to C grades in GCSE English by 10% and achieving five A* to C grades including English and maths by 5%. The impact was most significant on those in less privileged educational groups.

“Our other level one and two qualifications include the Award of Personal Effectiveness, Employability and Wider Key Skills.”