Character Awards aim to develop resilience and grit

Published

The Department for Education’s Character Awards 2016 are open for entries.

The awards were developed to help young people improve their academic performance, learn new skills that are valued by employers, and enable them to make a positive contribution to British society.

Now in their second year, the awards aim to recognise that character is already being encouraged, nurtured and developed alongside academic rigour through a variety of programmes in and outside schools and colleges.

All organisations working in the field of ‘character education’ can apply either as single organisations or in partnerships. Applications are welcome from schools, colleges and organisations working through schools and colleges in England involving children and young people up to the age of 18 years.

The following ASDAN centres were among last year’s 27 winners:

  • The Elizabeth Garrett Anderson School
  • Tapton School
  • The Mirfield Free Grammar and Sixth Form
  • The Swyne Park School
  • Emmanuel College
  • Percy Hedley School
  • Bolton Lads and Girls Club
  • Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School

Last year, Education Secretary Nicky Morgan said that each of the schools were ‘leading the way’ in developing character traits such as resilience and grit, ensuring pupils are prepared for future work or study. The closing date for entries is 23 May.

In a separate Department for Education initiative, two ASDAN centres are among 21 schools that have been recognised for closing the educational attainment gap.

La Retraite RC Girls’ School, Lambeth, and Maiden Erlegh School, Reading, have reached the final of the national Pupil Premium Awards, which celebrate innovative work in schools to support pupils from disadvantaged areas.

The winners will be announced in London on 12 May.